kidney_transplantation

Kidney Transplantation Surgery

A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy kidney from a living or deceased donor into a person whose kidneys no longer function properly.

The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs located on each side of the spine just below the rib cage. Each is about the size of a fist. Their main function is to filter and remove waste, minerals and fluid from the blood by producing urine.

When your kidneys lose this filtering ability, harmful levels of fluid and waste accumulate in your body, which can raise your blood pressure and result in kidney failure (end-stage kidney disease). End-stage renal disease occurs when the kidneys have lost about 90% of their ability to function normally.

People with end-stage renal disease need to have waste removed from their bloodstream via a machine (dialysis) or a kidney transplant to stay alive.

Types of Kidney Donation -

1.       Deceased-donor kidney transplant

2.       Living-donor kidney transplant

3.       Pre-emptive kidney transplant

Why it's done

A kidney transplant is often the treatment of choice for kidney failure, compared with a lifetime on dialysis. A kidney transplant can treat chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease to help you feel better and live longer.

Compared with dialysis, kidney transplant is associated with:

1.       Better quality of life

2.       Lower risk of death

3.       Fewer dietary restrictions

4.       Lower treatment cost

Some people may also benefit from receiving a kidney transplant before needing to go on dialysis, a procedure known as preemptive kidney transplant. If a compatible living donor isn't available, your name may be placed on a kidney transplant waiting list to receive a kidney from a deceased donor. How long you have to wait for a deceased donor organ depends on the degree of matching or compatibility between you and the donor, time on dialysis and on the transplant waitlist, and expected survival post-transplant. Some people get a match within several months, and others may wait several years.

Complications of the procedure

Kidney transplant surgery carries a risk of significant complications, including:

Blood clots and bleeding

Leaking from or blockage of the tube (ureter) that links the kidney to the bladder

Infection

Failure or rejection of the donated kidney

An infection or cancer that can be transmitted with the donated kidney

Death, heart attack and stroke

Anti-rejection medication side effects

After a kidney transplant, you'll take medications to help prevent your body from rejecting the donor kidney. These medications can cause a variety of side effects, including:

1.       Bone thinning (osteoporosis) and bone damage (osteonecrosis)

2.       Diabetes

3.       Excessive hair growth or hair loss

4.       High blood pressure

5.       High cholesterol

Living kidney donation

Paired organ donation

Paired organ donation

Living-donor organ donation chain

Living-donor organ donation chain

Finding a willing living kidney donor is an alternative to waiting for a compatible deceased-donor kidney to become available.

Family members are often the most likely to be compatible living kidney donors. But successful living-donor transplants are also common with kidneys donated from unrelated people, such as friends, co-workers or religious congregation members.

Paired donation is another type of living kidney donation if you have a willing kidney donor whose organ is not compatible with you or does not match well for other reasons. Rather than donating a kidney directly to you, your donor may give a kidney to someone who may be a better match. Then you receive a compatible kidney from that recipient's donor.

In some cases, more than two pairs of donors and recipients may be linked with a nondirected living kidney donor to form a donation chain with several recipients benefitting from the nondirected donor's gift.

If a compatible living donor isn't available, your name will be placed on a waiting list for a deceased-donor kidney. Because there are fewer available kidneys than there are people waiting for a transplant, the waiting list continues to grow.

During the surgery:

The surgeon makes an incision in the lower part of one side of your abdomen and places the new kidney into your body. Unless your own kidneys are causing complications such as high blood pressure, kidney stones, pain or infection, they are left in place. The blood vessels of the new kidney are attached to blood vessels in the lower part of your abdomen, just above one of your legs. The new kidney's ureter — the tube that links the kidney to the bladder — is connected to your bladder.

Results

After a successful kidney transplant, your new kidney will filter your blood, and you will no longer need dialysis.

To prevent your body from rejecting your donor kidney, you'll need medications to suppress your immune system. Because these anti-rejection medications make your body more vulnerable to infection, your doctor may also prescribe antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal medications.

It is important to take all your medicines as your doctor prescribes. Your body may reject your new kidney if you skip your medications even for a short period of time. Contact your transplant team immediately if you are having side effects that prevent you from taking your medications.


  • Address 1

    H. No. 18 DRM ROAD,  Shakti Nagar, Bhopal, (M. P.)

  • Address 2

    Neha Clinic Behind Apsara Cinema, Govindpura, Bhopal, (M. P.)

  • Contact

    +91-9827532446

    +91-9971902853

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    Sun : Closed 

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